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VIDEO: The Founders Minute: Part 2 – Subjectivity vs. Objectivity

Decision-making forms the backbone of any strategic planning process. However, organizations tend to gravitate towards quantitative, or objective criteria. This leaves behind the important, yet, often ignored element – subjectivity. The challenge: Quantifying subjectivity Consider a simple example like buying a car: while price is easy to quantify, style can be much harder to measure, as personal preferences vary widely. …

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Why Leaders Adopt Failing Business Strategies

Updated 2024 If you’re like us, you are over winter when the month of February rolls around. We, like much of America, look toward Groundhog Day to determine if we should anticipate six more weeks of snow or if we can expect to shed our winter layers a little sooner. Groundhog day also brings back fond memories of the classic …

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The Missing Piece between Problem and Strategy: Representation

Think of the last time you were presented with a problem and had to solve it. This can be any kind of problem. Maybe a lightbulb went out in your house and you wanted to fix it or maybe a friend told you to meet them at a certain restaurant, but you don’t know how to get there. Perhaps you’re …

Allovance teams with University of Michigan to offer innovative Decision Coach training

Allovance teams with UM to offer innovative Decision Coach training University of Michigan Economic Growth Institute Welcomes New Partnership with Local Software Startup, Allovance Ann Arbor-based software company Allovance announced the official launch of the new Allovance Certified Decision Coach certification program in partnership with the University of Michigan’s Economic Growth Institute (EGI).   The Allovance Certified Decision Coach program is …

VIDEO: The Founders Minute – Urgency vs. Importance

Your network server just crashed, and you cannot access shared files. This is certainly urgent, but depending on your business, it may not be important. The concepts of urgency and importance are often confused and at times are used interchangeably even though they are quite different. Welcome to the Founder’s Minute! This is an amazing opportunity to hear the founder …

Action Expresses Priorities

How many of you have heard the phrase or been told to, “get your priorities straight!”?  I am guessing many of you. It was probably a parent, teacher, or other authority figure. The phrase was likely included as a diatribe on how you were not meeting their expectations. The problems with this phrase and its common use are many. Chief …

Decision Fatigue

In July we celebrated Independence Day in the United States. This holiday serves as a birthday party of sorts for the country.  Everywhere you look you will see red, white, and blue colors and the word freedom inserted into random places.  In a recent blog post we talked about how we make 35,000 decisions each day.  How are these related?  …

What is 35,000?

35,000.  Depending on what we are talking about this may seem like a small amount or a larger amount. It really all depends on your anchor. What if I put a “$” in front of it? $35,000. Now we may have a different anchor.  Maybe it is a salary, or it makes you think of that Tesla 3 on your …

Jumping to Conclusions or Trusting your Gut?

Have you ever been in a situation where you made a decision based on extremely limited information? I am certain the answer is yes.  We all “make the quick call”, “follow our gut”, or “act fast”.  In fact, it is a behavior that is positively reinforced in advertising, pop culture, and personal/professional anecdotes. Han Solo is the epitome of a …

Taming Decision Remorse

“Hello, my name is Barnaby and I suffer from decision remorse” It is true. My parents can verify this. As a child, I stressed the small decisions and no matter what choice I made I wondered if I should have made the other decision.  Transformer or GI Joe? So much stress. As an adult, I must admit that I still …